Navigation (in separate window) Homepage Cz.Slania's Engravings Search Google

The Vatican 2003

Vatican 2000          Vatican 2002            Vatican 2003

Saint George was born in Cappadocia (in eastern Asia Minor) c. 270, and died about 303 as a Christian Martyr.  His life is obscured by legend, but his martyrdom at Lydda, Palestine, is generally considered a matter of historical fact, testified to by two early Syrian church inscriptions and by a canon of Pope Gelasius I, dated 494, in which St. George is mentioned as one whose name was held in reverence.   

The Vatican 2003. St. George slaying the Dragon.
  • The Vatican 2003. St. George slaying the Dragon. The stamp was issued to honour the 17th century of his death, and presented in sheets of 10 stamps. Printed by Post Sweden. The emblem in the lower left corner of the stamp is that of the 25th anniversary of the Pontificate of Pope John Paul II. Image by courtesy of Alberto Aletto (Italy). Scott # 1238. 

  • The Vatican 2003. Idem. Maximum Card. Image by courtesy of Mario Petretti (Italy). 

The most popular of the legends that have grown up around him relates to his encounter with the dragon. A pagan town in Libya was victimized by a dragon (representing the devil), which the inhabitants first attempted to calm down by offerings of sheep, and then by the sacrifice of various members of their community.   The daughter of the king (representing the Church) was chosen by lot and was taken out to await the coming of the monster, but George arrived, killed the dragon, and converted the community to Christianity.   Saint George has been adapted world wide as the saint fighting the evil and defending the good, in the end slaying the dragon (representing the evil).  

Vatican 2000          Vatican 2002            Vatican 2003


Navigation (in separate window) Homepage Cz.Slania's Engravings Search Google
Revised 19-jul-2007.Webmaster 
Copyright 2001-2007. All Rights Reserved

Homepage Heindorffhus